Articulation

What is Articulation?

Articulation is the process of developing a formal, bilateral, written agreement that identifies courses (or sequences of courses) on a “sending” campus (Oxnard College) that are comparable to, or acceptable in lieu of, specific course requirements at a “receiving” campus (a four-year college/university).

 

Why is Articulation Important?

Successful completion of an articulated course assures the student and the faculty that the student has taken the appropriate course and received the necessary instruction and preparation to progress to the next level at the college/university.

 

ASSIST – Key to transferring to the UC and CSU

ASSIST is a computerized student-transfer information system that can be accessed over the internet at http://www.assist.org.ASSIST displays reports of how course credits earned at the California Community Colleges can be applied when transferred to a California State University (CSU) or University of California (UC) campus.On ASSIST, students can search for their major to find out which of the CSU and UC campuses offer their major, then look up the Articulation agreement that exists between Oxnard College and that campus for that major.Admission requirements If Oxnard College does not offer a particular required course, students can look up the agreements with other local community colleges (such as Ventura College, Moorpark College, or Santa Barbara City College) to see if they offer the articulated course. Agreements will also specify admission requirements for particular majors.For more information, schedule an appointment with a counselor in the Transfer Center.

 

Articulation Agreements with Independent/Private Colleges/Universities

California Lutheran University

Pepperdine University’s Seaver College

University of La Verne

University of Southern California

General Education agreements with the UC and CSU

IGETC – For UC and CSU

CSU GE Requirements

UC TCA (Transfer Course Agreement)

TAG Agreements (Transfer Admission Guarantee)

Frequently Asked Questions